Animal-borne diseases while travelling

You can become ill from animal bites, from contact with animal fluids or feces or by eating food made with or from contaminated animals, including meat, fish and dairy products. Rabies, brucellosis, leptospirosis and certain viral hemorrhagic fevers are all spread through contact with animals or animal products. Reduce your risk of infection by avoiding close contact with wild, captive or domestic animals in any area where infection is being reported or is likely. Be particularly careful to prevent children from approaching or handling animals.

Protect yourself from rabies!

  • Avoid direct contact with all wild or domestic animals, especially dogs and monkeys in developing countries.
  • Don’t handle, feed or attract wild animals with open garbage cans or litter.
  • Instruct children to avoid wild or domestic animals, even if they appear friendly.
  • Prevent bats from entering living quarters.
If you’re bitten by a potentially rabid animal, wash the wound thoroughly with soap and water and get medical attention immediately. If you have difficulty getting treatment for rabies (obtaining rabies vaccine and rabies immunoglobulin after an incident), contact the nearest Canadian embassy or consulate.

Diseases transmitted from sand and soil

Bacteria found naturally in sand and soil can cause infection if they come into contact with broken skin. Wear shoes to prevent penetrating wounds and avoid direct contact with soil in locations where infections such as tetanus are reported or likely to occur. Some parasites, such as intestinal worms, also live in soil and can infect you if you eat soil-contaminated vegetables. Source: https://travel.gc.ca/travelling/publications/well-on-your-way#food_and_water_borne_diseases   For reservation and information please contact Toronto Travel Agency Altair Travel416-633-9404  

You can become ill from animal bites, from contact with animal fluids or feces or by eating food made with or from contaminated animals, including meat, fish and dairy products. Rabies, brucellosis, leptospirosis and certain viral hemorrhagic fevers are all spread through contact with animals or animal products. Reduce your risk of infection by avoiding close contact with wild, captive or domestic animals in any area where infection is being reported or is likely. Be particularly careful to prevent children from approaching or handling animals.

Protect yourself from rabies!

  • Avoid direct contact with all wild or domestic animals, especially dogs and monkeys in developing countries.
  • Don’t handle, feed or attract wild animals with open garbage cans or litter.
  • Instruct children to avoid wild or domestic animals, even if they appear friendly.
  • Prevent bats from entering living quarters.

If you’re bitten by a potentially rabid animal, wash the wound thoroughly with soap and water and get medical attention immediately.

If you have difficulty getting treatment for rabies (obtaining rabies vaccine and rabies immunoglobulin after an incident), contact the nearest Canadian embassy or consulate.

Diseases transmitted from sand and soil

Bacteria found naturally in sand and soil can cause infection if they come into contact with broken skin. Wear shoes to prevent penetrating wounds and avoid direct contact with soil in locations where infections such as tetanus are reported or likely to occur. Some parasites, such as intestinal worms, also live in soil and can infect you if you eat soil-contaminated vegetables.

Source: https://travel.gc.ca/travelling/publications/well-on-your-way#food_and_water_borne_diseases

 

For reservation and information please contact Toronto Travel Agency Altair Travel416-633-9404

 

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