Restrictions on things that you can bring to Canada

The importation of certain goods is restricted in Canada. Here are some examples of these goods. Make sure you have the information you require before attempting to import these items into Canada.

Cultural property

Some antiques or cultural objects considered to have historical significance to their country of origin cannot be brought into Canada without the appropriate export permits. Before you import such items, you should contact Canadian Heritage:

Explosives, fireworks and ammunition

You must have written authorization and permits to bring explosives, fireworks and certain types of ammunition into Canada. For more information, contact: Explosives Regulatory Division Natural Resources Canada 580 Booth Street, 10th Floor Ottawa ON K1A 0E4 Telephone: 613-948-5200 (regular hours -08:00 to 15:00 ET) Telephone: 613-947-9111 (after hours) Fax: 613-948-5195 Email: ERDmms@nrcan.gc.ca Website: www.nrcan.gc.ca

Firearms and weapons

You must declare all weapons and firearms at the CBSA port of entry when you enter Canada. If not, you could face prosecution and the goods may be seized. For more detailed information on importing a firearm into Canada, read Importing a Firearm or Weapon Into Canada or call the Border Information Service at one of the telephone numbers listed in the Additional information section. For information about applying for a Canadian firearms licence or a firearms registration certificate, or to obtain an Application for an Authorization to Transport Restricted Firearms and Prohibited Firearms (Form CAFC 679) in advance, please contact: Canadian Firearms Program Ottawa ON K1A 0R2 Telephone: 1-800-731-4000 FREE (toll-free in Canada and the United States) 506-624-5380 (from all other countries) Fax: 613-825-0297 E-mail: cfp-pcaf@rcmp-grc.gc.ca www.rcmp-grc.gc.ca Canada and the United States 1-888-848-8240 FREE

Prohibited goods

Obscene material, hate propaganda and child pornography cannot be imported into Canada.

Prohibited consumer products

This is a partial list of consumer products that are banned in Canada and cannot be imported:
  • Baby walkers
  • Infant self-feeding devices
  • Jequirity beans and items containing them
  • Lawn darts with elongated tips
A full list of products that are prohibited under the Canada Consumer Product Safety Act is provided in Canada Consumer Product Safety Act Quick Reference Guide - 2011.

Regulated consumer products

This is a partial list of regulated consumer products that must meet Canadian safety requirements: Car seats must meet the Canadian Motor Vehicle Safety Standard and have a National Safety Mark and a compliance label stating the height and weight of the child for which the seat was designed. For more information, see Child Car Seat Cross Border Shopping – What Parents and Caregivers Should Know. Children's Sleepwear must meet flammability requirements. For more information, see Children's Sleepwear: Flammability Requirements Guideline. Cribs should have the manufacturer's label indicating the model number, date of manufacture and assembly instructions. Strollers must meet labelling and performance requirements. Toys must meet mechanical, electrical, toxicological and flammability requirements. For more information, see Safety Requirements for Children's Toys and Related Products. Hockey helmets and face protectors must meet the requirements of standards published by the Canadian Standards Association (CSA). Playpens must meet labelling and performance requirements. For more information, please visit Health Canada's Bringing Consumer Products into Canada web page.

Used or second-hand mattresses

You cannot import used or second-hand mattresses into Canada unless you have a certificate, letter or any other document signed by a person qualified to clean and fumigate that clearly proves that the mattresses have been cleaned and fumigated.

Health products (prescription drugs)

In Canada, health products may be regulated differently than they are in other countries. For example, a drug that is available without a prescription in one country may require a prescription in Canada. There are also restrictions on the quantities and types of health products that can be brought into Canada. For more information on importing health products into Canada, please consult Health Canada's Guidance Document on the Import Requirements for Health Products under the Food and Drugs Act and its Regulations. Source: Source: https://travel.gc.ca/returning/customs/what-you-can-bring-home-to-canada

The importation of certain goods is restricted in Canada. Here are some examples of these goods. Make sure you have the information you require before attempting to import these items into Canada.

Cultural property

Some antiques or cultural objects considered to have historical significance to their country of origin cannot be brought into Canada without the appropriate export permits. Before you import such items, you should contact Canadian Heritage:

Explosives, fireworks and ammunition

You must have written authorization and permits to bring explosives, fireworks and certain types of ammunition into Canada. For more information, contact:

Explosives Regulatory Division

Natural Resources Canada

580 Booth Street, 10th Floor

Ottawa ON K1A 0E4

Telephone: 613-948-5200 (regular hours -08:00 to 15:00 ET)

Telephone: 613-947-9111 (after hours)

Fax: 613-948-5195

Email: ERDmms@nrcan.gc.ca

Website: www.nrcan.gc.ca

Firearms and weapons

You must declare all weapons and firearms at the CBSA port of entry when you enter Canada. If not, you could face prosecution and the goods may be seized.

For more detailed information on importing a firearm into Canada, read Importing a Firearm or Weapon Into Canada or call the Border Information Service at one of the telephone numbers listed in the Additional information section. For information about applying for a Canadian firearms licence or a firearms registration certificate, or to obtain an Application for an Authorization to Transport Restricted Firearms and Prohibited Firearms (Form CAFC 679) in advance, please contact:

Canadian Firearms Program

Ottawa ON K1A 0R2

Telephone: 1-800-731-4000 FREE (toll-free in Canada and the United States)

506-624-5380 (from all other countries)

Fax: 613-825-0297

E-mail: cfp-pcaf@rcmp-grc.gc.ca

www.rcmp-grc.gc.ca

Canada and the United States 1-888-848-8240 FREE

Prohibited goods

Obscene material, hate propaganda and child pornography cannot be imported into Canada.

Prohibited consumer products

This is a partial list of consumer products that are banned in Canada and cannot be imported:

  • Baby walkers
  • Infant self-feeding devices
  • Jequirity beans and items containing them
  • Lawn darts with elongated tips

A full list of products that are prohibited under the Canada Consumer Product Safety Act is provided in Canada Consumer Product Safety Act Quick Reference Guide – 2011.

Regulated consumer products

This is a partial list of regulated consumer products that must meet Canadian safety requirements:

Car seats must meet the Canadian Motor Vehicle Safety Standard and have a National Safety Mark and a compliance label stating the height and weight of the child for which the seat was designed. For more information, see Child Car Seat Cross Border Shopping – What Parents and Caregivers Should Know.

Children’s Sleepwear must meet flammability requirements. For more information, see Children’s Sleepwear: Flammability Requirements Guideline.

Cribs should have the manufacturer’s label indicating the model number, date of manufacture and assembly instructions.

Strollers must meet labelling and performance requirements.

Toys must meet mechanical, electrical, toxicological and flammability requirements. For more information, see Safety Requirements for Children’s Toys and Related Products.

Hockey helmets and face protectors must meet the requirements of standards published by the Canadian Standards Association (CSA).

Playpens must meet labelling and performance requirements.

For more information, please visit Health Canada’s Bringing Consumer Products into Canada web page.

Used or second-hand mattresses

You cannot import used or second-hand mattresses into Canada unless you have a certificate, letter or any other document signed by a person qualified to clean and fumigate that clearly proves that the mattresses have been cleaned and fumigated.

Health products (prescription drugs)

In Canada, health products may be regulated differently than they are in other countries. For example, a drug that is available without a prescription in one country may require a prescription in Canada. There are also restrictions on the quantities and types of health products that can be brought into Canada.

For more information on importing health products into Canada, please consult Health Canada’s Guidance Document on the Import Requirements for Health Products under the Food and Drugs Act and its Regulations.

Source: Source: https://travel.gc.ca/returning/customs/what-you-can-bring-home-to-canada

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