Insect- and tick-borne disease while travelling

Many travel-related diseases, like dengue fever, malaria or tick-borne encephalitis, are transmitted by infected insects such as mosquitoes, ticks, fleas or flies. Be aware of peak biting times (e.g. daytime vs. night-time biting mosquitoes) and areas (e.g. indoor vs. outdoor, rural vs. urban) in which certain insects may appear. Scorpions and biting spiders can also pose a risk in hot climates. Your first line of protection against any insect- or tick-borne disease is to practise protective measures to avoid insect bites:
  • Wear light-coloured, long-sleeved, loose-fitting shirts that are tucked in at the waist, long pants, shoes (not sandals) and a hat to cover exposed skin. In tick-infested areas, you can also tuck the cuffs of your pants into your socks, shoes or boots and tape them in place. Use insect repellent on exposed skin. Insect repellents containing DEET or Icaridin (also called Picaridin) are the most effective; use as directed by the manufacturer. Apply sunscreen first, if needed, followed by the repellent.
  • Stay in well-screened or completely enclosed air-conditioned rooms or sleep under an insecticide-treated bed net.
  • Inspect your body and clothing for ticks during outdoor activity and at the end of the day. Wear light-coloured or white clothing so that ticks can be more easily seen.
  • Apply a permethrin insecticide to your clothing and other travel gear for greater protection. Use only products manufactured for clothing and gear and don’t use them directly on skin. Permethrin-treated clothing is effective through several washes. Although permethrin-treated products aren’t readily available in Canada, a travel health clinic can advise you how to purchase permethrin and pre-treated gear before or during your trip.
If you’re going to areas where malaria exists, consult your health care provider or travel health clinic for an individual travel health assessment. Be sure to take anti-malarial medication as prescribed and don’t stop taking it until you finish the full course. If you have a reaction or illness when taking the medication, see a health care provider immediately to get another method of malaria prevention. If you become sick with fever within a year of returning to Canada, even if you took an anti-malarial medication while travelling, see a health care provider immediately and explain that you’ve travelled to or lived in an area where there is a risk of malaria. Infection with malaria is considered a medical emergency. Source: https://travel.gc.ca/travelling/publications/well-on-your-way#food_and_water_borne_diseases   For reservation and information please contact Toronto Travel Agency Altair Travel416-633-9404  

Many travel-related diseases, like dengue fever, malaria or tick-borne encephalitis, are transmitted by infected insects such as mosquitoes, ticks, fleas or flies. Be aware of peak biting times (e.g. daytime vs. night-time biting mosquitoes) and areas (e.g. indoor vs. outdoor, rural vs. urban) in which certain insects may appear. Scorpions and biting spiders can also pose a risk in hot climates.

Your first line of protection against any insect- or tick-borne disease is to practise protective measures to avoid insect bites:

  • Wear light-coloured, long-sleeved, loose-fitting shirts that are tucked in at the waist, long pants, shoes (not sandals) and a hat to cover exposed skin. In tick-infested areas, you can also tuck the cuffs of your pants into your socks, shoes or boots and tape them in place. Use insect repellent on exposed skin. Insect repellents containing DEET or Icaridin (also called Picaridin) are the most effective; use as directed by the manufacturer. Apply sunscreen first, if needed, followed by the repellent.
  • Stay in well-screened or completely enclosed air-conditioned rooms or sleep under an insecticide-treated bed net.
  • Inspect your body and clothing for ticks during outdoor activity and at the end of the day. Wear light-coloured or white clothing so that ticks can be more easily seen.
  • Apply a permethrin insecticide to your clothing and other travel gear for greater protection. Use only products manufactured for clothing and gear and don’t use them directly on skin. Permethrin-treated clothing is effective through several washes. Although permethrin-treated products aren’t readily available in Canada, a travel health clinic can advise you how to purchase permethrin and pre-treated gear before or during your trip.

If you’re going to areas where malaria exists, consult your health care provider or travel health clinic for an individual travel health assessment. Be sure to take anti-malarial medication as prescribed and don’t stop taking it until you finish the full course. If you have a reaction or illness when taking the medication, see a health care provider immediately to get another method of malaria prevention.

If you become sick with fever within a year of returning to Canada, even if you took an anti-malarial medication while travelling, see a health care provider immediately and explain that you’ve travelled to or lived in an area where there is a risk of malaria. Infection with malaria is considered a medical emergency.

Source: https://travel.gc.ca/travelling/publications/well-on-your-way#food_and_water_borne_diseases

 

For reservation and information please contact Toronto Travel Agency Altair Travel416-633-9404

 

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